Doing CSCW Research in Latin America: Differences, Opportunities, Challenges, and Lessons Learned - Contributions


Position Papers:

1. Developing Urban Computing Applications for Socialization in Public Spaces [PDF]

  • Andre de Oliveira Bueno - Department of Computer Science Federal University of São Carlos, Brazil – andre.obueno [at] dc.ufscar.br
  • Junia Coutinho Anacleto - Department of Computer Science Federal University of São Carlos, Brazil – junia [at] dc.ufscar.br

Abstract

Nowadays, people spend a fair amount of time with Online Social Networks. Real encounters, especially with non-related people, tend to not be encouraged any more. As mobile devices become more popular and powerful, combined with better mobile internet connection, it becomes more common to see new Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) around us in public places. Aware of that, the interest in the Urban Computing area has grown significantly. In this paper, we present two Urban Computing applications that aim at promoting socialization in public spaces, which are Selfie Cafe and Watering the Garden. Results show that people are willing to use this kind of application and, besides, they show a potential at leveraging socialization in the places they are installed.

 

2. Using Collective Intelligence to Improve Urban Mobility in Smart Cities [PDF]

  • Ana Paula Chaves - Federal Technological University of Paraná – Campo Mourão 1233 Via Rosalina M. dos Santos CEP 87301-899 Brazil – anachaves [at] utfpr.edu.br
  • Marco Aurélio Gerosa - Institute of Mathematics and Statistics - University of Sao Paulo 1010 Rua do Matão – Sao Paulo CEP 05508-090 Brazil – gerosa [at] ime.usp.br

Abstract

The cities are becoming smarter cities in order to improve their citizens’ quality of life. Our research focuses on developing technological solutions based on collective intelligence to improve urban mobility in Brazil. Our current studies focus on providing transportation information in real time and on the support of visually impaired people. We aim to extend these studies considering other Smart City characteristics and apply them to the city of São Paulo.

 

3. A Social Analysis of One Laptop per Child in Paraguay [PDF]

  • Morgan G. Ames - Intel Science and Technology Center for Social Computing University of California, Irvine – cscwlatinamerica [at] morganya.org

Discussion

The symbolism OLPC’s XO laptop in Paraguay takes on a different valence in light of the social history of technological adoption, adaptation, and innovation across Latin America. The project’s tensions around how technology is adopted, and on whose terms, have previously surfaced in other projects across Latin America. Medina’s account of the negotiations between local actors and international ‘experts’ over the utopian visions of a cybernetic society in Chile bears resemblance to the negotiations between Paraguay Educa and teachers. Likewise, Kreimer and Zabala’s discussion of the compelling ‘fictions’ around Chagas disease in Argentina have parallels in the charismatic stories that circulate about OLPC’s laptop in Paraguay and across Latin America. More broadly, the differences between “imported” and locally-developed meanings of OLPC’s laptop are yet another instantiation of Vessuri’s discussion of development versus dependency in early Latin American science and technology studies.

 

4. Social Media and Repressive Regimes: The Case of Cuba and Venezuela [PDF]

  • Michaelanne Dye - Georgia Institute of Technology 85 5th St. Atlanta, GA 30332 USA – mdye [at] gatech.edu
  • Annie Antón - Georgia Institute of Technology 85 5th St. Atlanta, GA 30332 USA – aa16 [at] gatech.edu
  • Eric Gilbert - Georgia Institute of Technology 85 5th St. Atlanta, GA 30332 USA – gilbert [at] cc.gatech.edu
  • Amy Bruckman - Georgia Institute of Technology 85 5th St. Atlanta, GA 30332 USA – asb [at] cc.gatech.edu

Abstract

Social media played a significant role in shaping the recent revolutionary wave of demonstrations and riots that ultimately led to rulers being forced out of power in Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, and Yemen. However, in other parts of the world, repressive regimes use technical and non-technical methods to suppress what their citizens say via social media. While much work has been conducted in other parts of the world, we know little about the mechanisms and effects of state-sponsored social media control in Latin America. In this work, we seek to address the technical, conceptual, and operational challenges that social media presents by conducting a mixed-methods study of social media in two countries governed by repressive regimes: Cuba and Venezuela.

 

5. WishBoard: Promoting Self-expression in Public Displays to Leverage the Notion of Community [PDF]

  • Vinicius Ferreira - Federal University of Sao Carlos Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 São Carlos, SP Brazil – vinicius.ferreira [at] dc.ufscar.br
  • Junia Anacleto - Federal University of Sao Carlos Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 São Carlos, SP Brazil – junia [at] dc.ufscar.br
  • Andre Bueno - Federal University of Sao Carlos Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 São Carlos, SP Brazil – andre.obueno [at] dc.ufscar.br

Abstract

The spread of mobile devices into the streets combined with the growing interest in interactive technologies in public settings raise a host of new challenge for human computer interaction. This study investigates the use of public displays in promoting the sense of community through the public self-expression. The approach involves a temporary interactive art installation that promotes people’s engagement on sharing anonymous wishes. This public sharing potentially leverage the feeling of a neutral ground for gathering and, consequently, socializing. In order to elicit data, we have made two deploys of a prototype named WishBoard in a ‘socially abandoned’ space. Analyzing the expressed wishes, we noticed cultural trails describing the profile of that community. Overall, this study demonstrates the role public displays and mobile devices can play in creating community meeting spaces and enabling individual expression in such social and communal spaces.

 

6. Challenges for Establishing a Latin American Community in HCI/UX [PDF]

  • J. Alfredo Sánchez - Universidad de las Américas Puebla, México – alfredo.sanchez [at] udlap.mx
  • Elizabeth S. Furtado - Universidade de Fortaleza, Brazil – elizabethsfur [at] gmail.com
  • Natalia Vivas - Usaria, Colombia – nataliavivas [at] gmail.com

Abstract

In this paper, we provide an overview of the efforts carried out in Latin America to develop a community around the multidisciplinary field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). We highlight our accomplishments, but also discuss major obstacles we have faced in order to take advantage of commonalities for developing both the academic and professional communities in HCI and User Experience (UX). We focus on the challenges that need to be addressed in order to strengthen and consolidate the community, and provide perspective on the advantages of further developing the HCI/UX community and its synergies with related areas, such as CSCW, design and ergonomics.

 

7. Studying Gamification as a Collaboration Motivator for Virtual Software Teams: Social Issues, Cultural Issues, and Research Methods [PDF]

  • Sabrina Marczak - Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul - Faculdade de Informática, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil 90619-900 – sabrina.marczak [at] pucrs.br
  • Fernando Figueira Filho - Departamento de Informática e Matemática Aplicada - U. Federal do Rio Grande do Norte Natal, RN, Brazil 59072-970 – fernando [at] dimap.ufrn.br
  • Leif Singer - University of Victoria - ECS Building, Room 504 3800 Finnerty Road - Victoria BC V8W 2Y2 Canada – lsinger [at] uvic.ca
  • Christoph Treude - Departamento de Informática e Matemática Aplicada - U. Federal do Rio Grande do Norte Natal, RN, Brazil 59072-970 – ctreude [at] dimap.ufrn.br
  • Flávio Steffens - Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul - Faculdade de Informática, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil 90619-900 – flavio.steffens [at] acad.pucrs.br
  • David Redmiles & Ban Al-Ani - Department of Informatics, University of California, Irvine Irvine, CA 92697-3425, USA - {redmiles,balani} [at] ics.uci.edu

Abstract

Gamification is the application of game elements and game design techniques in non-game contexts to engage and motivate people to achieve their goals. Motivation is an essential requirement for effective and efficient collaboration, which is particularly challenging when people work distributedly. In this paper, we discuss the topics of collaboration, motivation, and gamification in the context of software engineering. We then introduce our long-term research goal—building a theoretical framework that defines how gamification can be used as a collaboration motivator for virtual software teams. We also highlight the roles that social and cultural issues might play in understanding the phenomenon. Finally, we give an overview of our proposed research method to foster discussion during the workshop on how to best investigate the topic.

 

8. Ahora! Struggles of Collaborative Work Amongst Latin Americans [PDF]

  • Javier Tibau - Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Blacksburg, VA 23061 USA – jtibau [at] vt.edu
  • Marisol Villacres - Escuela Superior Politecnica del Litoral, Km. 30.5 Via Perimetral Guayaquil, Ecuador – lvillacr [at] espol.edu.ec
  • Katherine Chiluiza - Escuela Superior Politecnica del Litoral - Km. 30.5 Via Perimetral Guayaquil, Ecuador – kchilui [at] espol.edu.ec

Abstract

Research about collaborative work in Latin America suffers from endogenous misconceptions about our perceived homogeneity. At the same time, focused research emerging from the region on the topic of collaboration is woefully inadequate both for our purposes and to address misconstrued, misunderstood and over-generalized inferences made by the larger international community. The lack of sufficient research in the region has philosophical and pragmatic consequences.

 

9. Modeling a Design Process to Natural User Interface and not ICT Users [PDF]

  • Abib, J. C. - Federal University of São Carlos – UFSCar and Federal Institute of São Paulo – IFSP - Av. Heitor Souza Pinheiro, s/n CEP. 14801-600 Araraquara, SP, Brasil – janaina.abib [at] gmail.com
  • Anacleto, J. C. - Federal University of São Carlos – UFSCar - Rodovia Washington Luis, KM 235 CEP. 13565-905 São Carlos, SP, Brasil – junia.anacleto [at] gmail.com

Abstract

In this paper we present the formalization of a set of steps to guide designers in their design process activities using natural user interface (NUI) technologies for non-ICT users to support their established workflow. We are using these steps in a design process model, defining its construction phase, which is being applied to design workflow integrated ICT tool at a Brazilian chronic care hospital. During this procedure we observed the healthcare professionals in their daily activities, proposed solutions to integrate technology in their routine in a non-disruptive way and evaluated the results. These actions helped us to formalize an initial design process in order to support designer in their work of designing for natural solutions.

 

 

 




IMPORTANT DATES

  • Paper submission deadline: December 5th, 2014 - 5PM PST
  • Paper acceptance notifications: December 9th, 2014


WORKSHOP ORGANIZERS

  • Rogerio de Paula (IBM Research)
  • Cleidson R. B. de Souza (Vale Institute of Technology and UFPA)
  • David Millen (IBM Research)
  • Marcos R S Borges (PPGI/Federal University of Rio de Janeiro)
  • David Randall (University of Siegen)
  • Adriana Vivacqua (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro)